MTSS Resources

Response to Intervention (RTI) has been described in the Franklin Pierce Schools
as a multi-tiered system of supports (MTSS)
for providing high quality instruction and intervention matched to student needs
using learning rate over time and level of performance
to inform instructional decisions.

MTSS Pyramid
The Franklin Pierce Multi-Tiered System of Supports

Overview

The Franklin Pierce Schools has adopted the framework from the National Center on Response to Intervention to guide its implementation of Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS). The framework includes these essential components:

  1. Universal Screening
  2. Progress Monitoring
  3. School-wide multi-tiered prevention system
  4. Data-based decision-making for:
    1. Instruction and intervention
    2. Movement within the multi-level system
    3. Disability identification

Core Beliefs underlying the Franklin Pierce Multi-Tier System of Supports

  • Every student learns and achieves to high standards.
  • A culture reflecting a growth mind-set will be developed and enhanced to create a collective responsibility for student success.
  • Change is intentional, coherent, and dynamic.
  • Learning includes academic and social/emotional behavioral competencies.
  • Every student will be provided effective, explicit, systematic and relentless instruction with a research based core curriculum.
  • Academic and behavioral data will be used to inform instructional decisions.
  • Evidence-based interventions will be provided at the earliest identification of need, based on decision-making rules.
  • District policy regarding MTSS will be based on both evidence-based and research-based practice.
  • Every educator will continuously gain knowledge and develop expertise to build capacity and sustain effective practice.
  • Resources will be intentionally selected, designed and redesigned to match student needs.
  • Research and evidence based practice will be used in planning, implementing and evaluating instructional decisions.
  • Educators and parents will be part of the fundamental practice of effective problem solving and instructional decision-making